Call : 888-311-1142
  Local : 718-989-1555 Request a Job Application $1,500 to $2,000 Sign On Bonus $250 Referral Bonus

All Posts in Category: Alzheimers

How to Cope With Some Common Alzheimer’s Issues

EagleRidge_CoverImage

If someone you care about has Alzheimer’s, then you’re familiar with the worry, sadness, and feelings of anxiety that can accompany the diagnosis. Even if you’re not the one personally facing the memory loss, confusion, and compromised cognitive abilities that characterize the disease, caring for someone with Alzheimer’s is extremely challenging. Many of the difficult and stressful aspects of the disease affect caregivers, as well as patients. The good news is that there are things you can do to make the process easier for yourself, as well as for your loved one.

When caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, patience is key. Even in the early stages of the disease, cognitive changes can bring about difficulty performing everyday tasks, and corresponding feelings of frustration and agitation. It can be very difficult to observe someone you love, struggling to do things that used to be easy. By planning ahead and determining top priorities for your loved one’s care, however, you can minimize frustrations and help ease the transition from complete independence to greater reliance on caregivers.

For people with Alzheimer’s, different times of day often bring about different moods. Someone who is calm and easygoing in the afternoon, for example, may be more easily agitated in the morning. Scheduling potentially stressful events (like doctor’s visits) for times of day when your loved one is most relaxed, can be very helpful. Many daily tasks, such as dressing and bathing, may take longer than they used to. Allow plenty of time so there’s no need to rush. Providing fewer choices can reduce stress and allow your loved one to be more involved in the day-to-day aspects of their care: for example, giving two meal options, instead of an entire menu, can make it easier for them to choose and to maintain a sense of autonomy. Minimizing distractions, such as TV and radio, can help your loved one to be more engaged and attentive. Always making sure you keep things simple and giving step-by-step instructions for tasks can make it much easier to convey your wishes and help your loved one understand what’s expected of them.

iStock_000020646718SmallCrop-545x360

As Alzheimer’s disease progresses, safety concerns become more pressing. In order to protect your own safety, as well as that of your loved one, keep potentially hazardous materials, such as chemicals, matches, lighters, and knives, out of reach. Installing locks on cabinets or closet doors can be very helpful in securing dangerous items. Make sure that the water temperature is set within a range that won’t cause burns, even at maximum temperature.

Most of all, when caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, it’s important to stay flexible. Recognize that the issues affecting your loved one may be unpredictable; the best thing you can do for them (and for yourself) is to be willing to make adjustments as needed, and to remember that your support makes all the difference in your loved one’s quality of life.

Edison Home Health Care is happy to advise and assist you or any loved one who seek appropriate care of Alzheimer’s disease. Give us a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form and we will respond shortly.

Alzheimer Home Care New York

Read More

Appropriate Encouragement for Alzheimer’s Patients

429335_254027921347301_709274976_n

When someone you love is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, it’s normal to experience a range of emotions. You may feel anxious, worried, sad, and confused about what your role will be and what the future will hold. You’ll probably want to do whatever you can to help, but may be unsure of the best way how.

Although an Alzheimer’s diagnosis can be scary and overwhelming, the good news is that there is much you can do as a care partner, to assist your loved one in maintaining their quality of life. Although many people with Alzheimer’s will eventually need assistance with daily living, much of them continue to function with relative independence and engage in rewarding, meaningful activities in the early stages of the disease. In fact, maintaining an active social life, staying involved with hobbies, and continuing to participate as fully as possible in the activities they enjoy will help them stay healthy and may slow the progression of memory loss.

As a care partner, your support can have a big impact. Because people with early stage Alzheimer’s often retain a high level of function, it’s appropriate to provide gentle encouragement, rather than assuming responsibility for all of their needs. Whenever possible, you can facilitate social activities and time with friends and loved ones. Giving reminders about appointments and medication schedules, as well as reminding them of names, places, and words, can help them to retain independence by enabling them to keep track of crucial information. Encouraging them to take part in their favorite hobbies and activities – walking, bird watching, crossword puzzles, card games, or anything that provides mental and physical stimulation – is a great way to help them stay independent. Encouraging your loved one to stick to a daily routine is also tremendously helpful, as predictability and structure will enable them to participate more easily in daily activities.

Even though you can make a real difference in the life of someone with Alzheimer’s, it’s important to remember that you can’t do it all by yourself. It’s critical to seek out your own support system, take time for self-care, and recognize that, despite your best efforts, there will be major challenges. By staying aware of your own needs as a care partner while providing support to your loved one, you’ll be in a great position to help them maintain their independence for as long as possible.

Edison Home Health Care is happy to advise and assist you or any loved one who seek appropriate care of Alzheimer’s disease. Give us a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form and we will respond shortly.

Alzheimer Home Care New York

Read More

How To Aid Someone With Early-Stage Alzheimers

jigsaw head image

Helping to care for someone Alzheimer’s disease is a major challenge. When someone you care about is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, it’s common to experience feelings of sadness and anxiety. You will probably have many questions. What will life be like for your loved one as their memory loss progresses?  How can you plan ahead to insure that they get the care they need? For many people who find themselves in a care-giving role for someone with Alzheimer’s, the most important question is, how can I help? By considering the positive impact you can have in the life of someone with Alzheimer’s, you’ve already taken the first step on the way to being a great care partner.

Everyone experiences Alzheimer’s differently, and the progression of the disease after initial diagnosis varies widely between individuals. Some people maintain active professional and social lives, continue to enjoy travel and hobbies, and stay relatively independent for some time. When someone you care about is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, your role will probably start out as that of a care partner, rather than that of a care giver: instead of assuming responsibility for the person’s activities of daily living, it will be your job to insure that they continue to function independently for as long as possible.

shutterstock_16744414

People in the early stages of Alzheimer’s can also experience difficulty in keeping track of their belongings. Sticking to a routine and making sure that things are always in the same place can be very helpful. Help your loved one remember where important items like keys, glasses, and medications are kept by always putting them in an easily accessible, designated location.

One of the most important ways in which you can be of service as a caregiver is by helping your loved one to remember things. Most of us need occasional reminders to help us keep track of appointments, birthdays, and other important events. For people with early stage Alzheimer’s, these reminders are especially critical. Make a calendar to help you stay on top of dates and times; share notes and written schedules; and give frequent, gentle verbal hints and reminders. People with early stage Alzheimer’s often need help remembering familiar names, words, people and places. Forgetting things that were once familiar can be one of the most distressing parts of the initial stages of memory loss. As a care partner, you can provide subtle cues and prompts to remind your loved one of significant people and places and help them remember important names and words.

Edison Home Health Care is happy to advise and assist you or any loved one seeking elder care services. Give us a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form and we will respond shortly.

Alzheimer’s Home Care New York

Read More