Call : 888-311-1142
  Local : 718-989-1555 Request a Job Application $1,500 to $2,000 Sign On Bonus $250 Referral Bonus

All Posts in Category: Alzheimers

Alzheimer’s Late Stages and Weakened Immunity

114438475

The hardest thing for a family to accept is that their loved one is suffering from Alzheimer’s, without a cure to help them out of the pain. But there is a way to help cushion a parent’s aches and pains and be by their side to provide the emotional support that they need.

When the doctor has deemed your loved one as reaching the final stages of Alzheimer’s disease, the realization that their days are limited comes along with it. You now have to use your discretion to decide whether you alone can devote the care and attention to your ailing parent or whether a professional hospice is required instead. If you choose to assume the role of caregiver, remember is that although there is little you can do to ease the pain that Alzheimer’s causes, you can still preserve the dignity of the patient and the quality of their life through little touches. It is also important to recognize that the patient’s immune system will most likely be compromised. You’ll need to be cognizant of your loved one’s sensitive diet needs so that they consume the proper nutrients to avoid the flu or pneumonia. Doing so will reduce further discomfort and pain since the immune system won’t be able to properly produce antibodies.

Taking care of your parent, for instance, might require helping them perform simple activities like getting dressed or eating. While assisting them, you must keep in mind to do so with dignity- they’ll be embarrassed that they are no longer in a parental role, and instead are relying on your help. Besides the suffering that you parent is undergoing, you might suffer on an emotional level as well. When trying to come to terms with all of this, writing your thoughts and fears about the situation down might help for reflection. If you feel that you aren’t either emotionally or physically capable of taking care of your parent in the final stages of Alzheimer’s, hiring an aid or hospice is totally okay and in most cases preferred. The aid will make sure that your parent is cared for in an appropriate manner, so as to avoid catching the flu or pneumonia, as pneumonia for an elderly patient with a compromised immune system can mean a trip to the hospital. In every scenario you want to avoid any unnecessary trips to the hospital and any additional illnesses that your already ailing parent might catch, and that’s why proper care is of the utmost importance and cannot be stressed enough.

Edison Home Health Care is happy to advise and assist you or any loved one who seek appropriate care of Alzheimer’s disease. Give us a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form and we will respond shortly.

Alzheimer Home Care New York

Read More

Preparing for the Difficult Late Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

when-alzheimer-beats-boomerIn the early stages of Alzheimer’s, many patients retain the ability to function with some independence. Even as confusion and forgetfulness become more pronounced, they can still communicate verbally and engage in many activities of daily life, such as bathing, eating, and dressing on their own. As the disease progresses, though, most Alzheimer’s patients become completely dependent on their caregivers in all aspects of life. While this can be tremendously challenging for both patient and caregiver, there are things you can do to ease the transition and preserve the dignity and wellbeing of your loved one in the final stages of Alzheimer’s.

Taking on total responsibility for someone’s care is a huge challenge, and one that should not be faced alone. Connecting with support groups and home health organizations can be tremendously helpful, as can learning about other people’s experiences as caregivers. And, while you may be fully committed to providing care for your loved one at home, there may come a point when round-the-clock care from a health professional, or even a move to an assisted living facility, becomes necessary. If your loved one is experiencing repeated ailments, worsening of physical symptoms, or an inability to eat, it may be time to consider hospice or other palliative care options. For this reason, it’s important to discuss end-of-life care and their wishes surrounding the final stages of their life while your loved one is still capable of decision-making and verbal communication.

Even though your loved one may not be able to communicate verbally, it’s essential to provide them with a sense of dignity and well-being. Because someone with late stage Alzheimer’s experiences the world primarily through their senses, you can use sensory input to communicate when words are no longer sufficient. Playing your loved one’s favorite music, providing gentle massage, brushing their hair, cooking their favorite meals, and displaying bright flowers and family photographs can all have a soothing effect, and communicate to the Alzheimer’s patient that they are safe and loved. Similarly, you can watch for non-verbal cues, such as facial expression, movement, and body language, to determine whether your loved one is experiencing pain or discomfort.

Edison Home Health Care is happy to advise and assist you or any loved one who seek appropriate care of Alzheimer’s disease. Give us a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form and we will respond shortly.

Alzheimer Home Care New York

 

Read More

Safety Concerns in Alzheimer’s Mid-Stages

volunteer-services1

Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s presents many challenges. As the disease progresses from the early stages to middle stages, the patient becomes increasingly forgetful, and needs more help performing everyday tasks. This transition is often extremely stressful for both the patient – who may have difficulty adjusting to their dependence on others – and on the caregiver, who will have to deal with their loved one’s mood changes, memory difficulties, and frustration over their loss of control. As a caregiver, it’s essential to be as patient as possible, as well as to know your own limits and the ways in which you can make life easier and reduce your own stress.

During the middle stages of Alzheimer’s, safety concerns become more pressing. While people in the early stages of the disease may be able to drive, run errands, and live on their own, middle-stage Alzheimer’s patients’ abilities are often compromised to the point where they can no longer perform these activities safely. Just because they shouldn’t continue to do these things, however, doesn’t mean that they won’t want to: It can be incredibly difficult to convey to an Alzheimer’s sufferer that they need to give up activities that they have been doing for many decades. Knowing how to approach the topic with sensitivity and understanding is very important when it’s time to have a difficult conversation about safety.

Your loved one may become angry at the suggestion that it’s time for them to stop driving (or going out alone, or living by themselves). By far, the most important thing you can do as a caregiver is to be as patient as possible, and try to empathize with the confusion and frustration they are experiencing. This will help you to communicate gently, but firmly. In the event that they need to stop driving, involving their doctor is a good way to take some of the pressure off of you. Rather than focusing on their impairment, keep the conversation upbeat and use your voice and body language to show that you care. Finally, remember that, although conversations about safety are stressful, they are a vital part of your role as a caregiver, and will make your life easier in the long run!

Edison Home Health Care is happy to advise and assist you or any loved one who seek appropriate care of Alzheimer’s disease. Give us a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form and we will respond shortly.

Alzheimer Home Care New York

 

Read More

Dealing with Alzheimer’s Lengthy Mid-Stage

135448176

For many people with Alzheimer’s, the middle stage of the disease is the longest, sometimes lasting for many years. During this time, memory loss becomes more pronounced and daily tasks become more difficult. The Alzheimer’s patient may exhibit strange behaviors and personality changes. For a caregiver, these symptoms can be very disturbing. Know what to expect, and what you can do to help. This is essential for making the transition from independent living to being dependent, for both you and your loved one.

In the early stages of Alzheimer’s, many people continue to live fairly independently. As the disease progresses, however, most people gradually lose the ability to care for themselves. They may forget how to perform simple household tasks, exhibit extreme and troubling changes in personality and behavior, and have increasing difficulty communicating. This can be extremely challenging for caregiver and patient alike. At this point, you’ll have to assume responsibility for many facets of your loved one’s daily life: managing finances and healthcare decisions, personal hygiene, even eating and dressing. Many Alzheimer’s sufferers struggle to maintain their independence, and resent their loss of control. As a caregiver, it’s important to cultivate patience, and meet your loved one’s frustration with understanding and empathy. Although the transition from independent living to full reliance on caregivers is challenging, your help can make a big difference.

While middle-staged Alzheimer’s patients have difficulty engaging in activities that used to be second nature, it’s still important for them to have a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives. Despite the fact that they may no longer be able to fully participate in social life, it’s crucial to involve them as much as possible in the family activities. Talking with them, playing music, going on walks, doing simple crafts projects together, or gently asking for their help with basic tasks, such as setting the table, can go a long way toward providing a sense of structure and meaning. Additionally, sticking to a consistent routine can help to reduce frustration and make the activities like bathing, dressing, and mealtimes much easier.

Edison Home Health Care is happy to advise and assist you or any loved one who seek appropriate care of Alzheimer’s disease. Give us a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form and we will respond shortly.

Alzheimer Home Care New York

Read More

Coping With Patients Experiencing the Mid-stages of Alzheimer’s

alzheimerscare

When someone you love is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, deciding how to best care for them can be overwhelming. While you’ll want to do everything you can to promote their independence, comfort, and well-being, it can be difficult to determine the best way to do so. People will need more care as the disease progresses, and they will increasingly rely on caregivers and family members to support them in activities of daily living. It’s important to balance their immediate physical and basic needs (bathing, dressing, and eating) with their emotional, social and spiritual needs.

In the early stages of Alzheimer’s, many people continue to function with some independence, and may continue to work, drive, and socialize with relatively minor impairment. However, as the disease advances, everyday activities become more difficult. At a certain point, it will no longer be possible for your loved one to drive, and they will require more help managing simple tasks. It’s common for people in the middle stages of the disease to experience more severe memory loss, as well as dramatic mood and behavioral changes. As a caregiver, patience and flexibility are keys to helping you navigate these challenging aspects of the disease.

Seniors2-300x140

In addition to attending to your loved one’s physical needs, helping them to feel connected socially and to retain a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives is tremendously important, and can make a dramatic difference in their quality of life. Even simple activities can be significant for someone in the middle stages of Alzheimer’s, and can provide a great opportunity to spend time with your loved one in a fun, relaxed setting. Taking walks provides great exercise, as well as giving them the opportunity to spend time outdoors. Gardening is also a great outdoor activity that you can enjoy together. Painting, drawing, singing, or playing an instrument can provide an outlet for self-expression. The focus when performing these activities should be on enjoyment, rather than results. Refrain from criticism or setting too many rules, and pay attention to their responses to find the activities that bring them the most pleasure and least frustration.

Although people with Alzheimer’s do need to be treated with patience and gentleness, they can also benefit greatly from a sense of structure. Having them help with simple tasks – like setting the table or sweeping a patio – can help your loved one to feel a sense of accomplishment and involvement in family life. Finally, it’s essential to talk to your loved one. Even if they aren’t able to fully engage in conversation, talking to them will help them feel included and lessen feelings of isolation.

Edison Home Health Care is happy to advise and assist you or any loved one who seek appropriate care of Alzheimer’s disease. Give us a call at 888-311-1142, or fill out a contact form and we will respond shortly.

Alzheimer Home Care New York

Read More